Rum (or wine) sauce

(Recipe #7a, page 153)

Stir a bit of flour into melted butter, stir in boiling water, boil it with sugar, cinnamon, and a bit of salt, remove the sauce from the heat and stir in white wine and (optionally) also a tablespoon of rum.

Translated by David Green.

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English currant pudding

(Recipe #7, page 153)

Combine 1 pound [3-1/2 – 4 cups] of fine flour with ½ pound of very finely chopped suet and a bit of salt; stir in 2 eggs beaten to a froth, a generous ¼ quart of high-fat milk, 2 ounces [1/4 cup] of sugar, 7 ounces of currants, 7 ounces of seeded raisins, and seasonings to taste. Finally mix in a glass of rum and boil the pudding in a mold for 4–6 hours. Continue reading

Otter in fine herbs

(Recipe #6, page 149)

Prepare the otter and let it stand overnight as described above. Then take a few shallots or another onion, a bit of garlic, some parsley, 1 ounce of capers, 4 anchovies, a little thyme and basil, mince them all, stew them in a casserole with 4 tablespoons of olive oil, add the pieces of otter and stew them, turning once, then pour a glass of white wine over them. Continue reading

Turtle soup

(Recipe #1, pages 146 – 147)

Medium-size turtles are preferable to large ones, because the flesh of the latter is usually hard and tough. Hang the turtle by its hind feet on the morning of the preceding day; when the turtle stretches its head out of its shell, grasp it and cut it off with a sharp knife. Continue reading

Baked walleye or pikeperch

(Recipe #46, page 135)

Prepare the fish as described above; make closely spaced incisions on both sides, salt it, and it off after an hour.

Then mix several raw egg yolks with the juice of a lemon, minced shallots and parsley, and equal parts of fresh butter and anchovy butter; coat the fish with the mixture. Place it on slices of pork fat in a baking pan and bake it in a hot oven, occasionally adding a little white wine to the pan. When the walleye is done and a golden brown crust has formed, serve it at once, accompanied by a crayfish or oyster sauce.

Translated by David Green.

Fricassee of pike

(Recipe #43, page 135)

Clean the fish thoroughly and cut it in pieces. Place a generous amount of fresh butter in an earthenware pot, add the fish, white wine, some lemon slices without seeds, finely chopped anchovies, and salt. Sprinkle the top with fine zwieback crumbs or grated stale white bread. Stew the fish covered for ¼ hour or until done and place it on a serving platter. Stir a few tablespoons of thick sour cream into the sauce and pour it over the fish.

Decorate the border of the fricassee with rice cooked as a ragout (see section XI, no. 16).

Translated by David Green.

Stewed pickerel

(Recipe #34, page 133)

Use a sharp knife to shave the scales very close to the skin, leaving it white; split the fish and cut it into pieces of a convenient size, rinse them well, boil them for 5 minutes in salted water, and place them in another kettle.

Meanwhile boil capers in white wine and some of the fish broth, with lemon juice and peel, a generous knob of fresh butter, and some grated white bread. Pour this sauce over the pickerel and let the fish stew in it gently for ¼ hour. If desired, when the fish are served the sauce can be slightly seasoned with anchovies. Then stir in an egg yolk and bring the pickerel hot to the table.

Translated by David Green.

Perch with a French sauce

(Recipe #30, page 132)

Take perch weighing about ½ pound each, scale and gut them, wash them thoroughly, salt them, and place them in a casserole with plenty of butter. As soon as the have been heated on both sides, sprinkle some flour on them, turn the fish in it, and add sufficient French white wine to cover. At the same time, add some finely ground allspice, minced parsley, finely chopped shallots, and cook the perch slowly, tightly covered; they must not be allowed to fall apart.

Translated by David Green.

Eel in sauce with a puffed pastry border

(Recipe #13, pages 128 – 129)

Cut up the eel, salt it, and rinse it again. For 4 pounds of eel, take 1 tablespoon of flour, stir it over heat with 2 ounces of melted butter to make a roux, add good meat stock, lemon slices without peel or seeds, 1 bay leaf, and Madeira or white wine.

Cook the eel until done and place it on a warmed platter. Immediately add morels, capers, or mushrooms to the sauce, stir in egg yolks, and pour the sauce over the eel. Decorate the edge of the platter with a border of puff pastry.

Translated by David Green.

Salmon with herbs

(Recipe #4, pages 126 – 127)

Clean the salmon thoroughly and cut it into appropriate pieces. Mix together the following herbs: parsley, shallots, tarragon, and capers, refreshed and filleted anchovies, and some ground pepper. Melt fresh butter and add the chopped herbs and enough lemon juice to lend an acidulated flavor. Place it on the stove; when it has warmed, add the salmon and let it stew for 2 hours, turning frequently; the butter must remain melted but must not brown. Now heat the pan with the butter and sauté the salmon for 10 minutes, brushing the herbs on both sides of the salmon frequently with a feather.

For the sauce, add 2 glasses of white wine to the herbs and boil down to a few spoonfuls of concentrated broth; if it is not acidulated enough, add some lemon juice. Stir in an egg yolk to thicken the sauce.

Translated by David Green.