English warm meat pudding

(Recipe #37, pages 160 – 161)

Take 2 pounds of pure beef, remove all sinews, and chop it very fine together with a small onion. Then cream ¼ pound of butter and gradually stir in 8 whole eggs, a few spoonfuls of sour cream, lemon peel, a bit of pepper and allspice, an absolutely fresh herring cleaned and chopped very fine, 3 ounces of stale white bread (without the crust) moistened in cold water and squeezed, finely chopped mushrooms and morels, and the necessary salt. Continue reading

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Wild duck

(Recipe #8, page 149)

Regarding the age of the duck, see the discussion of goose above. If the duck is to be cooked whole, rub it with fine salt and pepper and set it tightly covered on the stove with a generous amount of butter and suet, with two bay leaves, 2 lemon slices, and 8 juniper berries added; after it has begun to brown on both sides, pour in a little boiling water and simmer the duck until it is tender and lightly browned. Some thick cream is a good addition to the preparation. Continue reading

Fried otter

(Recipe #5, pages 148 – 149)

Cut the otter in pieces, remove the head, and let the pieces stand overnight with all kinds of herbs, diced carrots, onions, garlic, a few bay leaves, salt, coarsely ground spices, and a glass of vinegar. Then heat a knob of butter, add a couple of sliced onions and a few diced carrots, lay the pieces of otter on top, cover, and let them stew. Continue reading

Espagnole sauce

(Recipe #2a, page 148)

To make an Espagnole sauce, cover the bottom of a deep casserole with fresh butter to half the thickness of a finger, top it with a pound of sliced lean raw ham, followed by 3–4 large sliced Spanish onions, a loin of veal, 2 old partridges or 2 old pigeons, an old hen, and some scraps of raw or cooked fowl. Pour in two ladles of meat stock and place the casserole over low heat, letting the combination cook down and turn light brown, but being careful not to let it scorch. Then fill the casserole with bouillon, bring it to a boil, degrease it completely, add a few carrots, leeks, and parsnips, and simmer slowly. Continue reading

Roast badger

(Recipe #15, page 150)

A young badger is reputed to be very tender and palatable, similar to pork tenderloin. Let it stand 2–3 days in vinegar with onions, carrots, sage, all kinds of kitchen herbs, bay leaves, pepper, cloves, and salt. Lard and roast it like a young rabbit but for a shorter time, because of its tender meat.

Translated by David Green.

Turtle soup

(Recipe #1, pages 146 – 147)

Medium-size turtles are preferable to large ones, because the flesh of the latter is usually hard and tough. Hang the turtle by its hind feet on the morning of the preceding day; when the turtle stretches its head out of its shell, grasp it and cut it off with a sharp knife. Continue reading

Pickled mackerel

(Recipe #73, pages 141 – 142)

Prepare and boil the fish as in the preceding recipe, but use equal parts of water and vinegar with the herbs listed. When it is done, remove it from the broth and replace it when the broth has cooled. Any kind of fish left to cool in the broth sacrifices some flavor.

To serve, place the fish on a platter garnished with parsley sprigs and pass olive oil, vinegar, pepper, and mustard on the side, or serve it with unpeeled potatoes and butter.

Translated by David Green.