New rolled English pudding

(Recipe #6, page 153)

Ingredients: 1 pound of fine flour, ½ pound of finely chopped suet, 1 egg, 1 small cup of cold water, 1 spoonful of sugar. Continue reading

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English plum pudding, no. 3

(Recipe #4, page 152)

Ingredients: 1 pound each of finely shredded firm beef suet, flour, seeded raisins, and currants, 8 eggs, ¼ pound sugar, 3 ounces of finely ground almonds, ½ a nutmeg, 1 teaspoon of salt, ½ ounce of citron, ½ ounce of orange peel, 1 wineglass of rum, and enough milk that a spoon can stand upright in the dough. Continue reading

English plum pudding, no. 2

(Recipe #3, page 152)

Ingredients: ½ pound of raisins, ½ pound of currants, ½ pound of chopped suet, ½ pound zwieback crumbs, ½ pound sugar, ¼ pound of citron, 2–3 ounces of ground almonds, 2–3 ounces of orange peel, ½ a nutmeg, 1 wineglass of rum, and 4 whole eggs (without beating the whites). Continue reading

English plum pudding, no. 1

Ingredients: 4 eggs, their whites beaten to soft peaks, ¾ quart of fresh cream, ½ pound of fine flour, ½ pound of finely chopped suet, ½ pound of well-washed currants, ¾ pound of seeded, coarsely chopped raisins, 2–3 ounces of butter, 1 ounce of sliced candied citron, 1 ounce of orange peel, ½ a nutmeg, half wineglass of rum, and a bit of salt. Continue reading

How to cook puddings

(Recipe #1, pages 151 – 152)

Care of Molds. It should be noted to start that a pudding mold that has been damaged must not be used until it has been filled with water—obviously the outside must be perfectly dry—and set in a dry place for a while, until you are convinced that it is watertight. If there is the slightest opening, the pudding will be a total failure. Continue reading

Roast badger

(Recipe #15, page 150)

A young badger is reputed to be very tender and palatable, similar to pork tenderloin. Let it stand 2–3 days in vinegar with onions, carrots, sage, all kinds of kitchen herbs, bay leaves, pepper, cloves, and salt. Lard and roast it like a young rabbit but for a shorter time, because of its tender meat.

Translated by David Green.

Turtle soup

(Recipe #1, pages 146 – 147)

Medium-size turtles are preferable to large ones, because the flesh of the latter is usually hard and tough. Hang the turtle by its hind feet on the morning of the preceding day; when the turtle stretches its head out of its shell, grasp it and cut it off with a sharp knife. Continue reading