Otter in fine herbs

(Recipe #6, page 149)

Prepare the otter and let it stand overnight as described above. Then take a few shallots or another onion, a bit of garlic, some parsley, 1 ounce of capers, 4 anchovies, a little thyme and basil, mince them all, stew them in a casserole with 4 tablespoons of olive oil, add the pieces of otter and stew them, turning once, then pour a glass of white wine over them. Continue reading

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Turtle soup

(Recipe #1, pages 146 – 147)

Medium-size turtles are preferable to large ones, because the flesh of the latter is usually hard and tough. Hang the turtle by its hind feet on the morning of the preceding day; when the turtle stretches its head out of its shell, grasp it and cut it off with a sharp knife. Continue reading

Pickled mackerel

(Recipe #73, pages 141 – 142)

Prepare and boil the fish as in the preceding recipe, but use equal parts of water and vinegar with the herbs listed. When it is done, remove it from the broth and replace it when the broth has cooled. Any kind of fish left to cool in the broth sacrifices some flavor.

To serve, place the fish on a platter garnished with parsley sprigs and pass olive oil, vinegar, pepper, and mustard on the side, or serve it with unpeeled potatoes and butter.

Translated by David Green.

Boiled mackerel

(Recipe #72, page 141)

The mackerel is a delicate, fatty fish. It should be gutted as closely as possible to the head, washed, and placed for an hour in heavily salted water with a generous admixture of vinegar. Mackerel may be cooked whole or cut into pieces. If cooked whole, place it curled on a platter and pour hot vinegar over it. Continue reading

Sturgeon

(Recipe #54, pages 136 – 137)

When the sturgeon has been killed and gutted, wrap it in a cloth and lay it on a stone slab in the cellar for a day or two, because it is tough when cooked fresh. Before boiling, rub it down several times with salt and water to remove all traces of slime; depending on its size, cut it into 5–12 pieces, which can be further divided into convenient pieces after cooking. Continue reading

Rolled eel

(Recipe #12, page 128)

Clean and gut the eel as described in no. 1. Next remove the bones, spread the body of the eel, and sprinkle it with salt. If the eels are small, sew two together so that the roll will not be cramped.

Make a stuffing of 4–5 hardboiled eggs, parsley, shallots, thyme, and marjoram (all chopped), nutmeg, and salt. If available, add a few small chopped fish. Mix the stuffing well and spread it over the interior of the eel, roll it up firmly, and carefully tie it together with twine. Continue reading

Strassburg goose-liver pâté — no. 2

(Recipe #3, pages 118 – 119)

Finely mince 1 pound of veal, ½ pound of pork fat, and half a goose liver; add a slice of white bread soaked in white wine, ¼ pound of anchovies, 1–2 ounces of capers, the peel of a lemon, a handful of shallots sautéed in butter, truffles, cloves, thyme, and basil, all finely minced and well mixed. Prepare a mold as in the preceding recipe and spread the dough in it; place half the forcemeat on the dough, followed by 1½ sliced goose livers, truffles, and the rest of the forcemeat. Seal the pâté and bake it as in the preceding recipe.

Translated by David Green.

Goose giblets Stettin style

(Recipe #156, page 115)

As in the preceding recipe, the meat is boiled and skimmed in salted water, then cooked until done in the thin broth. Melt butter and sweat some minced onions in it; lightly brown flour in the butter and stir in some of the broth. Add the whole to the giblets, spice them with pepper and thyme, and cook the giblets in the well-rounded gravy a few minutes longer.

Translated by David Green.