Wild duck

(Recipe #8, page 149)

Regarding the age of the duck, see the discussion of goose above. If the duck is to be cooked whole, rub it with fine salt and pepper and set it tightly covered on the stove with a generous amount of butter and suet, with two bay leaves, 2 lemon slices, and 8 juniper berries added; after it has begun to brown on both sides, pour in a little boiling water and simmer the duck until it is tender and lightly browned. Some thick cream is a good addition to the preparation. Continue reading

Wild goose

(Recipe #7, page 149)

An old wild goose is even tougher than an old domestic goose. Therefore roast a whole goose only when it is young. If it is older, cut it into small pieces as described in section I, pour boiling vinegar with bay leaves and cloves over it, and marinate it for 8 days, turning the pieces daily. Then prepare it like jugged hare, but omitting the sugar. Continue reading

Fried otter

(Recipe #5, pages 148 – 149)

Cut the otter in pieces, remove the head, and let the pieces stand overnight with all kinds of herbs, diced carrots, onions, garlic, a few bay leaves, salt, coarsely ground spices, and a glass of vinegar. Then heat a knob of butter, add a couple of sliced onions and a few diced carrots, lay the pieces of otter on top, cover, and let them stew. Continue reading

Roast badger

(Recipe #15, page 150)

A young badger is reputed to be very tender and palatable, similar to pork tenderloin. Let it stand 2–3 days in vinegar with onions, carrots, sage, all kinds of kitchen herbs, bay leaves, pepper, cloves, and salt. Lard and roast it like a young rabbit but for a shorter time, because of its tender meat.

Translated by David Green.

Another method (to pickle salt herring)

(Recipe #85, pages 143 – 144)

Prepare the herring as above, soaking them in water or preferably milk for two days to extract the salt completely. Then gut the fish and cut the flesh smooth. Layer the fish in a preserving jar or stoneware crock with whole shallots or small onions, capers, cloves, pepper, lemon slices, and a few bay leaves, and cover with vinegar. The milt can also be passed through a sieve and combined with vinegar to make a thick sauce and poured over the herring. Continue reading

Sturgeon

(Recipe #54, pages 136 – 137)

When the sturgeon has been killed and gutted, wrap it in a cloth and lay it on a stone slab in the cellar for a day or two, because it is tough when cooked fresh. Before boiling, rub it down several times with salt and water to remove all traces of slime; depending on its size, cut it into 5–12 pieces, which can be further divided into convenient pieces after cooking. Continue reading

Minnows (small fish)

(Recipe #49, pages 135 – 136)

Minnows are neither scaled nor gutted, only rubbed with a bit of salt and washed on a sieve placed in water. At the same time, place a pot with water and salt, some bay leaves, a lot of peppercorns, and shallots or small onions on the stove, and boil for a bit to draw out the seasoning. Dump the fish into the water and remove the pot after a few moments; these tiny fish scarcely need cooking. Place them in a serving dish with the seasoning and send them to the table cold with oil and vinegar.

Translated by David Green.