Grouse pie (highly recommended)

(Recipe #14, page 149)

Cut the bird into small pieces, remove all the bones and cook the pieces a bit in butter. Then place them in wine vinegar with pepper, nutmeg, and pearl onions for a few hours. Continue reading

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Wood grouse

(Recipe #13, page 149)

Only young birds should be roasted. With rare exceptions, older birds remain tough even if they are buried in a sack for 8–10 days under 2–3 feet of soil (the recommended way of tenderizing the flesh); they are best used in a ragout or fricassee. Stuff the bird with the following stuffing: mince a piece of good veal with some raw ham, including the fat; add a few egg yolks, a couple of ground cloves, some crème fraîche, salt, white bread crumbs, and the beaten egg whites. Mix thoroughly, stuff the grouse, and roast like turkey.

Translated by David Green.

Ragout of frog legs

(Recipe #3, page 148)

Place the frog legs in a container with water, vinegar, and salt; wash and scour them thoroughly with a brush. Then melt a stick of butter, place the frog legs into the melted butter with some salt, and stew them tightly covered until almost done. Then dust them with a bit of flour, add strong bouillon, mace, and a few lemon slices, cook until the frog legs are completely tender, and thicken the sauce by stirring in egg yolks. Continue reading

Lobster fricassee with fish dumplings and asparagus

(Recipe #89, pages 144 – 145)

Thoroughly clean fat spring chickens, put them on the stove with barely enough salted water to cover; add a generous knob of butter and with some mace, and simmer until done, skimming carefully. A good ¼ hour beforehand, add very tender asparagus, well peeled and parboiled. Continue reading

Baked walleye or pikeperch

(Recipe #46, page 135)

Prepare the fish as described above; make closely spaced incisions on both sides, salt it, and it off after an hour.

Then mix several raw egg yolks with the juice of a lemon, minced shallots and parsley, and equal parts of fresh butter and anchovy butter; coat the fish with the mixture. Place it on slices of pork fat in a baking pan and bake it in a hot oven, occasionally adding a little white wine to the pan. When the walleye is done and a golden brown crust has formed, serve it at once, accompanied by a crayfish or oyster sauce.

Translated by David Green.

Pike or pickerel with egg sauce (also delicious)

(Recipe #40, page 134)

Put the fish’s tail in its mouth and place it in not too large a casserole (to keep the broth from becoming tepid) with equal parts of vinegar and cold water, some onions, two bay leaves, some peppercorns, a half to whole parsley root, and the necessary salt. Set it on the stove and boil until done. Carefully remove the fish to a heated platter, pour the following sauce over it, and cover.

Prepare some mushrooms, crayfish tails, and crayfish butter. Stir 1 spoonful of flour into a knob of foaming butter; meanwhile stir 10 egg yolks into a scant quart of strong bouillon. Pour the bouillon into the flour and butter and let it come to a boil, constantly stirring. Add the mushrooms, crayfish tails, and butter, and a bit of lemon juice, and pour the sauce over the fish.

Translated by David Green.

Eel in sauce with a puffed pastry border

(Recipe #13, pages 128 – 129)

Cut up the eel, salt it, and rinse it again. For 4 pounds of eel, take 1 tablespoon of flour, stir it over heat with 2 ounces of melted butter to make a roux, add good meat stock, lemon slices without peel or seeds, 1 bay leaf, and Madeira or white wine.

Cook the eel until done and place it on a warmed platter. Immediately add morels, capers, or mushrooms to the sauce, stir in egg yolks, and pour the sauce over the eel. Decorate the edge of the platter with a border of puff pastry.

Translated by David Green.