Black bread soufflé

(Recipe #11, page 164)

Cream 7 ounces of butter, gradually stir in 10 egg yolks, 5 ounces of sugar, some cloves, cinnamon, cardamom, and lemon peel, 7 ounces of grated and sieved black bread, 3 ounces of currants, and (optionally) 1 ounce of almonds; finally fold the beaten egg whites into the dough. Bake for 1 hour. Continue reading

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White bread pudding (very tasty)

(Recipe #34, page 160)

Ingredients: 2 pounds + 2 ounces of 2-day-old white bread, ¼ pound of butter, 10 eggs, ¼ pound of sugar [2/3 cups], ¼ pound of currants, cinnamon or lemon peel, and a small glass of rum or arrack. The addition of 2½ ounces of slivered or coarsely ground almonds, ½ ounce of citron, and some cloves and cardamom makes the pudding especially fine. Continue reading

Wood grouse

(Recipe #13, page 149)

Only young birds should be roasted. With rare exceptions, older birds remain tough even if they are buried in a sack for 8–10 days under 2–3 feet of soil (the recommended way of tenderizing the flesh); they are best used in a ragout or fricassee. Stuff the bird with the following stuffing: mince a piece of good veal with some raw ham, including the fat; add a few egg yolks, a couple of ground cloves, some crème fraîche, salt, white bread crumbs, and the beaten egg whites. Mix thoroughly, stuff the grouse, and roast like turkey.

Translated by David Green.

Wild goose

(Recipe #7, page 149)

An old wild goose is even tougher than an old domestic goose. Therefore roast a whole goose only when it is young. If it is older, cut it into small pieces as described in section I, pour boiling vinegar with bay leaves and cloves over it, and marinate it for 8 days, turning the pieces daily. Then prepare it like jugged hare, but omitting the sugar. Continue reading

Roast badger

(Recipe #15, page 150)

A young badger is reputed to be very tender and palatable, similar to pork tenderloin. Let it stand 2–3 days in vinegar with onions, carrots, sage, all kinds of kitchen herbs, bay leaves, pepper, cloves, and salt. Lard and roast it like a young rabbit but for a shorter time, because of its tender meat.

Translated by David Green.

Turtle soup

(Recipe #1, pages 146 – 147)

Medium-size turtles are preferable to large ones, because the flesh of the latter is usually hard and tough. Hang the turtle by its hind feet on the morning of the preceding day; when the turtle stretches its head out of its shell, grasp it and cut it off with a sharp knife. Continue reading

Another method (to pickle salt herring)

(Recipe #85, pages 143 – 144)

Prepare the herring as above, soaking them in water or preferably milk for two days to extract the salt completely. Then gut the fish and cut the flesh smooth. Layer the fish in a preserving jar or stoneware crock with whole shallots or small onions, capers, cloves, pepper, lemon slices, and a few bay leaves, and cover with vinegar. The milt can also be passed through a sieve and combined with vinegar to make a thick sauce and poured over the herring. Continue reading