Flour and bread pudding to accompany cooked fruit

(Recipe #30, page 159)

Ingredients: a scant ½ quart of milk, 3 ounces of butter, 7 ounces of good flour [1-2/3 cups], 8 eggs, ½ teaspoon of mace, ½ pound of grated stale white bread, 2 tablespoons of sugar, ½ glass of rum. Continue reading

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Potatoes and dried pears (for everyday meals)

(Recipe #16, page 70)

Unpeeled pears are appropriate. Rub them several times with warm water between your hands, rinse, and set on the stove with a piece of bacon, covered with plenty of water.

Boil until almost soft, then sprinkle some groats over them, add the cooked potatoes and salt, and stew until the whole is quite soft, creamy, and moist.

Translated by David Green.

Potatoes and fresh pears

(Recipe #15, page 70)

This dish, following the instructions above, is best prepared with a small piece of lean pork already cooked until half done; otherwise use fat and butter.

The pears must be almost done before adding the boiled potatoes. Stir in some vinegar when serving, but do not let the potatoes become too mushy.

Instead of vinegar, a few sour apples can be added to the pears after the potatoes. Like all potato dishes of this sort, this dish must be not be overcooked. If no pork has been included, use whatever is available; some kind of vinegared meat is most appropriate.

Translated by David Green.

Blindhuhn (blind hen), a national dish of Westphalia

(Recipe #28, page 57)

Beforehand boil a piece of ham or smoked bacon. Take green beans, which may be somewhat on the hard side, wash them thoroughly and cut them into small round pieces on a cutting board, a handful at a time; add the previously shelled white beans, cut a little more than half as many carrots as green beans into small dice. Rinse and add in batches to the ham, bringing to a boil each time. If available, add a few peeled and quartered pears; when the vegetables are almost done, add quartered potatoes with as much salt as needed, along with apples cut in pieces. Cook everything until tender. Continue reading