Grouse pie (highly recommended)

(Recipe #14, page 149)

Cut the bird into small pieces, remove all the bones and cook the pieces a bit in butter. Then place them in wine vinegar with pepper, nutmeg, and pearl onions for a few hours. Continue reading

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Stewed leg of mutton

(Recipe #89, pages 96 – 97)

Set a leg of mutton that is not too fresh and has been well pounded (see above) on the stove with water and Weißbier [wheat beer] (which must not be bitter), skim it, add cloves, peppercorns, 3 bay leaves, a few whole onions, and a bundle of fresh herbs such as tarragon, grape leaves, marjoram, and basil; stew slowly tightly covered for 2 hours. Continue reading

Beef soup with pearl barley or rice

(Recipe #7, page 29)

Cook bouillon according to No. 1 (general instructions). However, strain through a hair sieve [Haarsieb] after only half an hour.

Melt a small piece of butter in an iron pot. For every four servings, stir in a heaping TBS of flour till it has a yellowish sheen. Without stirring, the butter would cook to pieces. Strain the bouillon, removing the sediment. Add the flour [mixture] and the strained broth to the pot and cook. If one intends to have pearl barley in the soup, it should be added now, along with mirepoix [celery, carrots, onion].

However, rice only requires 1 – 1/4 hours to cook, as noted in general instructions above.

One hour before serving, several pearl onions, asparagus, or young kohlrabi may be cooked with the soup. One may also add cauliflower [to the soup], as long as it has been cooked first, because it should not be overcooked.

It is unnecessary to overcook the asparagus for this soup, unless it was not fresh.

Shortly before serving, add several young, finely chopped celery leaves or a little finely ground mace to the tureen and if desired, cook dumplings in the soup.