Mutton soup

(Recipe #13, pages 30 – 31)

Wash the meat, and place it on the stove in boiling water with not too much salt. Skim. Add a small knob of celery root, a young kohlrabi, finely chopped onions, sweated flour (see no. 7) and pearl barley or cooked rice. Cook slowly, tightly covered. If one would like semolina in the soup, sprinkle it into the broth and stir, half an hour before serving. Potato dumplings may be cooked in this soup, and egg yolks and nutmeg or finely chopped parsley can be stirred into the soup. However, this is unnecessary for the everyday table.

Cooking time is approximately 2 hours.

Kohlrabi

(Recipe #21, page 55)

Peel and wash the bulbous stems, then cut them into strips or slices, removing all tough portions. Cook until tender in boiling salted water. Then make a roux with melted butter or suet, add fresh milk or meat stock to taste, along with nutmeg and salt, and stew the kohlrabi. If the kohlrabi were harvested young, the heart leaves can be sliced thin and boiled separately, mixed with butter and meat stock, and placed as a garnish around the kohlrabi, stewed and served like cauliflower. If the leaves are no longer tender enough, surround the kohlrabi with sausages or sliced sweetbreads and serve with cutlets, meat patties, roulades, or meatballs.

Preparation time will be about 1½ hours.

Note: Blue kohlrabi is preferable to white kohlrabi; it is milder and doesn’t become moldy as easily as the white.

Translated by David Green.

French soup

(Recipe #8, page 29)

For this soup, prepare all possible young vegetables, such as kohlrabi, celery, savoy cabbage, asparagus, cauliflower, and peas. Cut the rooted vegetables in strips, and chop the savoy cabbage finely. Simmer in 1/4 pound fresh butter, in a pungent bouillon, with asparagus and cauliflower cooked thoroughly.

Mushroom dumplings, as well as egg dumplings, go well with this soup, as do croutons.

[She did not mention beef extract, but without meat, the extract would be necessary to have a meat bouillon.]

Beef soup with pearl barley or rice

(Recipe #7, page 29)

Cook bouillon according to No. 1 (general instructions). However, strain through a hair sieve [Haarsieb] after only half an hour.

Melt a small piece of butter in an iron pot. For every four servings, stir in a heaping TBS of flour till it has a yellowish sheen. Without stirring, the butter would cook to pieces. Strain the bouillon, removing the sediment. Add the flour [mixture] and the strained broth to the pot and cook. If one intends to have pearl barley in the soup, it should be added now, along with mirepoix [celery, carrots, onion].

However, rice only requires 1 – 1/4 hours to cook, as noted in general instructions above.

One hour before serving, several pearl onions, asparagus, or young kohlrabi may be cooked with the soup. One may also add cauliflower [to the soup], as long as it has been cooked first, because it should not be overcooked.

It is unnecessary to overcook the asparagus for this soup, unless it was not fresh.

Shortly before serving, add several young, finely chopped celery leaves or a little finely ground mace to the tureen and if desired, cook dumplings in the soup.